Hitched Up: Cannon Beach and the Historic Columbia River Highway

After seeing how much Gaius loved playing on the sand back in Washington, I was really glad that our first stop in Oregon was Cannon Beach.

Home of the iconic Haystack Rock, this picturesque beach town is dog-friendly and lined with art galleries, cafes, and charming boutiques. The beach is nothing short of stunning with teal blue waves crashing along the shore and miles upon miles of soft sand as far as the eye can see. If you’re into long walks on the beach, this is definitely the place to be.

The beach also has an accessible entrance, allowing visitors of all abilities to get right down to the water. An accessible trail to the beach, parking, and restrooms are available at the Gower Street entrance. Beachgoers who use wheelchairs can also rent specialized beach wheelchairs for free, available for pick-up from the Cannon Beach City Hall building. Bravo, Cannon Beach! Click here for more information about renting a beach wheelchair at Cannon Beach.

I had seen pictures of Haystack Rock but was not expecting it to be so large. I learned that this massive hunk of stone is a popular nesting spot for puffins. We didn’t spot any puffins during our visit but there were plenty of pups on the beach having fun.

Gaius had a blast running around like he owned the place and making friends with other visitors. One even gave him some fancy duck jerky just for being cute.

Gaius was due for one of his annual vaccines so I made an appointment with the veterinarian in the neighboring town of Seaside. After his appointment we stopped off at the Seaside Farmers Market to peruse- who doesn’t love a good farmers market? We ended up taking home fresh bowls of ramen, chèvre from a local creamery, goat’s milk caramel spread, and all-natural hazelnut butter.

We also visited Hug Point State Recreation Area, just south of Cannon Beach. The beach at Hug Point is beautiful and during low tide visitors can explore its exposed caves and tide pools.

I was thrilled to see accessible parking, restrooms, and a paved trail seemingly leading to the beach.

Unfortunately, although this trail offers a great view of the beach and ocean, it ends with stairs and does not provide an accessible path down to the sand.

Next we traveled inland towards U.S. 30, also known as the Historic Columbia River Highway to check out some of the many waterfalls along the way. Our home base was Viento State Park, which sits right on the Columbia River that separates Oregon from Washington, and is only about an hour east of Portland. Interstate 84 runs directly through the park, splitting it into a north and south area. The northern end houses the RV campground, day use picnic area, a nature trail that travels through the trees ending at a picturesque pond, and an accessible trail to the shore of the Columbia River.

Columbia River access

The southern end houses tent camping sites, a few short nature trails, and a trail that leads to the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. The State Trail is a real treat for waterfall enthusiasts. The entire trail spans between Troutdale and The Dalles with several hiking/biking segments that are accessible.

We traveled an approximately 2-mile portion of the trail between Starvation Creek and Lancaster Falls. The Starvation Creek trailhead has a paved parking lot with accessible parking, restrooms, and picnic area with a beautiful view of Starvation Creek Falls.

Heading west, the wide, paved, and mostly flat trail parallels the interstate a short distance before entering the forest and leading visitors to several waterfalls. Though there’s a bit of road noise to begin with, visitors can expect a great view of the Columbia River from the trail.

The first waterfall along the way is Cabin Creek Falls, where the best view lies directly on the paved trail.

Next up is Hole in the Wall Falls, my personal favorite from the bunch. Just off of the main trail sits an accessible picnic table in a paved viewing area that provides a grand view of the falls.

From Hole in the Wall Falls, a non-accessible dirt trail ascends steeply into the hillside passing Lancaster Falls.

The falls can be spotted approximately .02 miles past Hole in the Wall Falls from the accessible main trail, though the view is obstructed by trees.

Located about 20 minutes east of Portland. Multnomah Falls is another great accessible attraction along the Historic Columbia River Highway. The trailhead and parking area is positioned between the eastbound and westbound lanes of Interstate 84, with left-side on and off ramps. Accessible parking, restrooms, and picnic areas are onsite with a paved accessible trail to the base of the falls.

A paved, but non-accessible trail that includes a few stairs, leads from the base of the falls up to the bridge. We hiked up to the bridge but to be honest, I wasn’t very impressed with the 1/2 view of the falls and felt the base of the falls was the best spot for a picture. The area was damaged by a fire last year and the trail beyond the bridge was closed during our visit. Still, the falls were lovely and next time I’d probably spend by time admiring them from the base.

During my initial trip planning I thought we would stay in Portland to explore the city for at least a week. After all, Portland is the sister-city to our Austin, TX home base and perhaps the only other city in the country to embrace weirdness.

But after experiencing nearly a month of smoke-clouded skies in Canada followed by a few weeks of gloomy rainclouds along the Washington coast, these Texans really wanted to find some sunshine before autumn set in. We did however make one trip into the city to meet up with an old friend from high school and his girlfriend. Though we opted for the less-busy east side of downtown, Portland definitely gave off an Austin vibe with it’s trendy eateries, bars, and music scene. Oh and the beards, so many beards.

We had a great time catching up, laughing, and indulging in some of the best bar food we’d ever eaten. It was a nice way to end our stay in the area as we prepared to continue south on our journey in the morning. Next stop- Oregon’s warmer and sunnier High Desert.

Thanks for reading!

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